Pies

Shepherd’s Pie

I first tasted this classic New England meal, appropriately enough, in the food hall of Harrod’s in London, many years ago. It was a revelation. It has a timeless wildness to it, that speaks of a life lived outdoors and long ago, and of the fireplace and hearth, the warmth of home in a rugged country. This is a meal created by rural working folks and those who hunted and labored in the outdoors and in the garden. The term “shepherd’s pie” did not appear until 1877 or so, and was essentially a meat pie with potato crust. But its origins are solidly within the Leekley family’s land of origin (we arrived in New Hampshire from Northern England in the 1820’s) and it connects us to our roots in England and Scotland. It is filled with tasty treats and savory nuggets, and is a delightful feast to enjoy with friends and family. We made this one from smoked lamb sausage, smoked pork kielbasa sausage, smoked turkey chunks and smoked duck breast. It’s crazy savory and umami wonderful with it’s own light gravy made from bone broths from previous meals. Just like making quiche and other elaborate pies, most of the work is in the preparation and planning for a Shepherd’s Pie. Most importantly is to accumulate flavorful reduced sauces and broths. We use meats from our favorite previously made meals like Duck Confit and Porcini Turkey Thighs, as well as roasted chicken and lamb. If possible, it’s important to have duck fat on hand – it’s magical – or some rich, left-over gravy. This is a wonderful meal to make in the days after a Holiday, using up all the leftovers. Also, this pie is best when using several different kinds of meat combined, like duck, turkey, fresh sausage and […]

Cajun Crawfish Pie

I had a close friend who was Cajun and he once took me to a small village in southern Louisiana where he grew up, not too far from the town of St. Martinville, famous for the statue of Evangeline, the High Priestess of myth and poetic legend among the Cajun and a powerful symbol of the Acadian diaspora. (The real person’s name was Emmeline Labiche, and the truth is better than Romeo and Juliet, but that’s a story for the next cookbook.) I had written about the Cajun people in a novel so I was familiar with their culture, food and society. One reason for my passion for Cajun food is that my mother’s side of the family has roots in the French Canadian community and thus…